News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

For journalist or media enquiries, please contact our press office.

Cyclists hugging

"Emotions were high on finishing and it made the happy tears pour! I felt like I'd really achieved something.”

In this blog post, Kate Berry shares why she encouraged a team of work colleagues and friends to sign up to last year’s Ride for Ryder cycling challenge in support of Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice, and why she’s planning on doing the same again this year.

Richard Littledale with his arm round his late wife Fiona

The muscle memory of grief

"People who have lost a limb sometimes experience the presence of the limb long after it has gone – as if the nervous system refuses to accept this new, altered reality. Just recently, I experienced a similar thing with my grief on two occasions." Blogger Richard Littledale opens up about times when he has turned to his late wife Fiona, only to find her no longer there. 

Leckhampton supporters Paulette and Julia

"Supporting our local hospice is something we do together as mum and daughter."

This Mother’s Day we’re sharing the heart-warming words of mother and daughter, Paulette and Julia, who together raise vital funds for their local hospice, Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire.

Leckhampton supporter Kate Carr in the gorgeous Cotswolds countryside

Kate takes on Ultramarathon Cotswold Way Challenge for our Leckhampton Court Hospice

Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice supporter Kate Carr shares why she is trekking 100km through the Cotswold countryside this year to raise vital funds for her local hospice, plus lots of fundraising and training tips.

A girl wrapped in a blanket browsing the Online Community on her tablet 546

What to do if you struggle with days like Mother’s Day

"For those of us whose Mums have died, we are often at a loss as to how to deal with Mother's Day," acknowledges Christine Ellis, Head of Family Support at our Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice. "Do we ignore it? Do we feel sad or filled with regret? Do we celebrate it?" Chris, who has helped countless families through bereavement, shares her expert advice.

Briony in her uniform at Wheatfields

#TeamIncredible takes on the London Landmarks Half 2019

This Sunday, a thirty strong group of #TeamIncredible runners are taking on the London Landmarks Half Marathon to raise money and be there for more people when it really matters. Here, just a few of them share why they’re donning their trainers and hitting the streets of the capital.

Image of Abi Brown, a recent respite inpatient at Sue Ryder Duchess of Kent Hospice

Putting the 'rest' in respite care

Abi Brown, 42, was diagnosed with terminal bowel cancer in March 2018. She has recently been an inpatient at Sue Ryder Duchess of Kent Hospice for two weeks of respite care. In her own words, Abi describes her time at the hospice.

Anne running past in her Sue Ryder vest at the Brighton Marathon

From snow to sea: nurse Anne's marathon journey

Anne, a Research Nurse at our Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice, battled sub-zero training runs to take part in the Brighton Marathon and raise over £1,500 to be there when it really matters. Here she talks about her #TeamIncredible experience.

A Sue Ryder The Chantry Neurological Care Centre resident painting

It’s time to get it right for people with neurological conditions in England

People with neurological conditions in England are being let down by the very health and care systems that are supposed to be supporting them – that’s the finding of our new report Time to get it right, writes our Policy and Public Affairs Manager (England) Duncan Lugton.

Chantry resident Simon is helped into bed using a chair lift

Over 15,000 people with neurological conditions are being placed in nursing homes for the elderly, our shocking report reveals

Our new report, 'Time to get it right' published today, gives a comprehensive picture on how people with neurological conditions such as motor neurone disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease and acquired brain injury are being let down by health and social services in England.