News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

For journalist or media enquiries, please contact our press office.

Image of Sue Ryder directions signage outside Sue Ryder Manorlands Hospice

Coronavirus (Covid-19) guidance: visiting a Sue Ryder hospice or neurological centre

We understand that visiting is loved ones is crucial to the health and wellbeing of all our patients and clients, and the safety of the people in our care remains of paramount importance.

A Sue Ryder nurse with a patient at Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre Lancashire

“If we’d stopped and thought about the scale of the task, we’d have fallen over…but we did it”

The Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre Lancashire opened, after years in the planning, during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. Centre director Terry Mears and neuro rehab lead Hannah Halliwell share their experience of such a difficult, yet rewarding, time.

A woman holding a red rose in her hands

Facing your first Valentine’s Day after the death of a loved one

Your first Valentine’s Day after the death of a loved one can be a painful reminder of what you’ve lost. Bianca Neumann, Head of Bereavement at Sue Ryder, offers advice on how to face Valentine’s Day for the first time without your partner by your side.

A person at home, accessing the Online Community on an ipad

Sue Ryder encourages those grieving to ‘reach out’ amidst huge increase in demand for bereavement services

A year since the first coronavirus death in the UK, Sue Ryder has seen a significant rise in the need for its bereavement support. The charity is encouraging those who have lost loved ones to ‘reach out’ and seek support for their grief, as the number of people who have died with the virus is now over 100,000.

Cecelia, a nurse at Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre Stagenhoe

“I have more time to spend with the people that I look after and I feel that I am able to give the quality of care each of them deserves”

Sue Ryder Nurse Cecilia Mwenda joined the team at Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre Stagenhoe in March last year. She talks about the importance of building relationships with the people she cares for and the more personal support this allows her to provide, as well as the challenges they've faced at Stagenhoe during the pandemic.

Sue Ryder logo

Letter to the Business Secretary calling for bereavement leave

Sue Ryder and a coalition of MPs, charities, businesses, faith leaders, and healthcare professionals are calling on the Government to introduce statutory paid bereavement leave for all UK employees grieving the loss of a close relative or partner.

Finlay the therapy dog sitting next to his retirement basket full of doggy treats.

Finlay the therapy dog retires after years of helping residents at Sue Ryder Stagenhoe

For nearly a decade, Finlay the therapy dog has been helping and cheering up residents at Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre Stagenhoe, but now he is hanging up his collar and settling into retirement after bringing joy to so many people.

A person sitting by a window in their living room

“Even the very best of times can have a tinge of sadness” Sue Ryder Counsellor Felicity offers advice on coping with grief over Christmas

Felicity Ward, Counsellor for Sue Ryder’s Online Bereavement Counselling service, gives her advice for people grieving at Christmas, the complex emotions which can arise during such a time of togetherness, and how their family and friends can provide support over the festive period.

A lady alone at home by a window, during Christmas

“It is OK to feel the way you do” Sue Ryder Counsellor Shane's advice for grieving at Christmas

Shane Smith, Counsellor for Sue Ryder’s Online Bereavement Counselling service, offers his advice for those grieving at Christmas who might be concerned about being with others or how they might feel at this time of year.

Barry Whaite at the Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre Lancashire.

“I have nothing but praise for Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre Lancashire. Without them, I am sure that I would still be bed ridden”

Barry Whaite was admitted to Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre Lancashire in April 2020, his head the only part of his body he could move independently. Barry spent all of the first national lockdown undergoing physiotherapy and rehabilitation, but in August 2020, he left the centre, walking again with help from a walking aid.