News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

For journalist or media enquiries, please contact our press office.

Image of Marilyn and Liz volunteering at Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice Coffee Shop

'The Coffee Shop is a little oasis' - Hospice Care Week stories 2019

The Coffee Shop at Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice is run entirely by volunteers such as Marilyn and Liz and the funds it raises go towards supporting the expert and compassionate care at the hospice. To mark Hospice Care Week 2019, Marilyn and Liz tell us why they see the Coffee Shop as a 'little oasis' for visitors, families and patients.

Image of Ian, a volunteer driver at Sue Ryder St John's Hospice

Ian – a driving force at Sue Ryder St John’s Hospice - Hospice Care Week stories 2019

Ian from Bedford is a volunteer driver at Sue Ryder St John’s Hospice and makes a real difference to patients and relatives. In this blog post, Ian talks to us about his rewarding role and how he started volunteering after his late wife was cared for at the hospice.

James and Natalie who work on our maintenance team at Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice

“We help make sure the care given here continues” - Hospice Care Week 2019 stories

When thinking about the people who make our expert and compassionate palliative care possible, many think of our nurses, doctors and care staff. However, there are many working alongside our medical team who make sure our care can continue, like Natalie and James at Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice.

Image of Hugh Walton at the Hamburg Ironman in a Sue Ryder t shirt

Hugh’s Ironman effort for Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice - Hospice Care Week 2019 stories

In this blog post we hear how Hugh has gone to Ironman efforts in Hamburg to raise funds for Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice.

Sue and Pete Woolfitt with Community Fundraiser Victoria Potter and Sue Ryder Nurses

Big-hearted bucket collectors raise £100,000 for Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall hospice - Hospice Care Week 2019 stories

Come rain or shine, Sue and Pete Woolfitt have loyally held bucket collections for Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice for nearly a decade – raising an incredible £100,000. This Hospice Care week we'd like to say thank you for their amazing support.

Occupational Therapist Heather Bayliss outside Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Day Hospice

"My role is to empower people – and often it’s the smallest things that make the biggest difference."

Occupational Therapist Heather Bayliss shares how Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court’s multidisciplinary Day Hospice team supports people living with cancer, lung disease, heart failure or neurological conditions in Gloucestershire.

7 in 10 people haven't discussed their death with loved ones infographic

Silence is deadly: stigma attached to 'the D-word' means Brits are missing out on a better death

Whilst Brits know how they would spend their last days on earth, few are preparing for them, our new survey has revealed. As a result of this, we are calling on the nation to start talking about death.

Thorpe Hall Hospice's Wellbeing Cafe organisers Margretta and Vicky.

Thorpe Hall Hospice’s pioneering Wellbeing Café brings patients "a sense of joy"

Staff at Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice have been trialling an innovative Wellbeing Café to support patients to live as fully and actively as possible with great success.

A Sue Ryder The Chantry Neurological Care Centre resident painting

It’s time to get it right for people with neurological conditions in England

People with neurological conditions in England are being let down by the very health and care systems that are supposed to be supporting them – that’s the finding of our new report Time to get it right, writes our Policy and Public Affairs Manager (England) Duncan Lugton.

Chantry resident Simon is helped into bed using a chair lift

Over 15,000 people with neurological conditions are being placed in nursing homes for the elderly, our shocking report reveals

Our new report, 'Time to get it right' published today, gives a comprehensive picture on how people with neurological conditions such as motor neurone disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease and acquired brain injury are being let down by health and social services in England.