News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

For journalist or media enquiries, please contact our press office.

Physiotherapist Funmi Shitta-Bey at the St John's Day Therapy service

“We help people in our care live their lives to the full.”

“When living with a life-limiting condition, there is still life to be lived. And here at Sue Ryder St John’s Hospice our multi-disciplinary teams do all we can to make sure that life is fulfilling.” These are the words of Funmi Shitta-Bey, Physiotherapist and Day Therapy Lead at Sue Ryder St John’s Hospice in Bedfordshire, who tells us more about her role.

Jonathon, Richard and Simon Cox in their cycle helmets

Gloucestershire family take on 100-mile RideLondon-Surrey challenge for Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice

A family are challenging themselves to complete a 100-mile cycle to raise money for their local Sue Ryder Leckhampton Hospice, who supported their wife and mother when she died.

Cover of Postcards from the Land of Grief by Richard Littledale

Why I wrote 'Postcards from the Land of Grief': a book about bereavement

After Richard Littledale lost his beloved wife Fiona back in 2017, he decided to chronicle his experience of bereavement in the hope of comforting others. They have been turned into a book Postcards from the Land of Grief, published today, and 100% of the royalties will go directly towards Sue Ryder's expert and compassionate care.

7 in 10 people haven't discussed their death with loved ones infographic

Silence is deadly: stigma attached to 'the D-word' means Brits are missing out on a better death

Whilst Brits know how they would spend their last days on earth, few are preparing for them, our new survey has revealed. As a result of this, we are calling on the nation to start talking about death.

Thorpe Hall Hospice's Wellbeing Cafe organisers Margretta and Vicky.

Thorpe Hall Hospice’s pioneering Wellbeing Café brings patients "a sense of joy"

Staff at Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice have been trialling an innovative Wellbeing Café to support patients to live as fully and actively as possible with great success.

Pat at the party with her daughter

"It was an absolute thrill to be nominated to attend the Royal Garden Party. I got to see the Queen looking lovely in her pink suit!"

Pat McClelland, Lead Volunteer at our Airedale Shopping Centre charity shop in Keighley, West Yorkshire, was among the guests invited to Buckingham Palace for the Queen’s Annual Royal Garden Party in May. 

Miki Mitchell whose husband was cared for by Manorlands and the Queensbury Queens of the Mountain cycling club

“Dust off your bike and join us so that Manorlands can be there for more people like Chris.”

When she lost her husband Chris to cancer last October, Miki Mitchell was devastated. However, through it all, our Sue Ryder Manorlands Hospice was there to provide support and now, one year on, Miki is supporting them – bringing with her 100 entrants to Manorlands’ annual Bronte Sportive cycling event.    

Nilesh with his mother as a baby

“Grief is universal; it crosses all boundaries and is something that we will all share.”

Online Community member Nilesh Makwana recounts how losing his parents, Subhadra and Ramniklal, prompted him to join our online bereavement forum in 2017.

Alan with his bike getting ready for Ride for Ryder in 1988

Why I'm taking on Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice's Ride for Ryder for the fourth time

Alan Sutor took part in Sue Ryder's first Ride for Ryder cycling event in 1988 aged just 14. Fast-forward 31 years to the present day and he is preparing to take on the 2019 Ride for Ryder. He tells us why.

Richard Littledale with his arm round his late wife Fiona

The muscle memory of grief

"People who have lost a limb sometimes experience the presence of the limb long after it has gone – as if the nervous system refuses to accept this new, altered reality. Just recently, I experienced a similar thing with my grief on two occasions." Blogger Richard Littledale opens up about times when he has turned to his late wife Fiona, only to find her no longer there.