News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

For journalist or media enquiries, please contact our press office.

Occupational Therapist Heather Bayliss outside Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Day Hospice

"My role is to empower people – and often it’s the smallest things that make the biggest difference."

Occupational Therapist Heather Bayliss shares how Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court’s multidisciplinary Day Hospice team supports people living with cancer, lung disease, heart failure or neurological conditions in Gloucestershire.

Jonathon, Richard and Simon Cox in their cycle helmets

Gloucestershire family take on 100-mile RideLondon-Surrey challenge for Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice

A family are challenging themselves to complete a 100-mile cycle to raise money for their local Sue Ryder Leckhampton Hospice, who supported their wife and mother when she died.

7 in 10 people haven't discussed their death with loved ones infographic

Silence is deadly: stigma attached to 'the D-word' means Brits are missing out on a better death

Whilst Brits know how they would spend their last days on earth, few are preparing for them, our new survey has revealed. As a result of this, we are calling on the nation to start talking about death.

A panel comprising human rights experts (left to right) Tor Butler-Cole QC, Richard Harding, Sanchita Hosali and Jacqui Graves answered questions.

Our Human Rights in End of Life Care Conference: a retrospective

Sue Ryder hosted a free conference on human rights in end of life care on Thursday 27th June 2019 in London, exploring further how applying a human rights approach to practice can help deliver person-centred and compassionate care.

A What Matters to Me training workshop

Sharing learnings from What Matters to Me: A Human Rights Approach to End of Life Care

Jacqui Graves, Human Rights Lead at Sue Ryder shares her experience and learnings of implementing the training programme to date.

Holli Posnett with one of the Sue Ryder Nurses who cared for her mum

"At the worst time of your life, a Sue Ryder hospice is the best place you can be."

Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice has had a big place in Holli Posnett’s heart ever since her mum Christine was cared for there in 1998. To mark the 20th anniversary of her Mum’s passing, Holli decided to raise as much money as she could for the hospice in a year. This is her story.

David Gallop with his late father Harry

"Dad will be with me at the start, during my toughest challenges and at the finish line."

After his dad Harry was cared for at Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice, David Gallop wanted other families to benefit from the same care that his did. So he set himself a challenge – taking on one of the flattest, fastest half marathons in the country to raise funds for the hospice.

Miki Mitchell whose husband was cared for by Manorlands and the Queensbury Queens of the Mountain cycling club

“Dust off your bike and join us so that Manorlands can be there for more people like Chris.”

When she lost her husband Chris to cancer last October, Miki Mitchell was devastated. However, through it all, our Sue Ryder Manorlands Hospice was there to provide support and now, one year on, Miki is supporting them – bringing with her 100 entrants to Manorlands’ annual Bronte Sportive cycling event.    

Laura Gilder's mum playing on a kids' toy

“Eight of us chose to run the Cheltenham Half for Sue Ryder. If Mum were here, she would be doing the same.”

Laura Gilder’s mum was cared for by staff at Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice in 2018. In this blog post, 30-year-old Laura writes about the care that inspired her, and seven of her family members, to line up behind the start line of the Cheltenham Half Marathon last year in support of Sue Ryder.

Dee View Court Nurses discuss a patient

"No decision about me without me": why families must be involved in 'do not resuscitate' orders

Yesterday’s Daily Telegraph reported that, according to NHS nurses, too many patients are being subjected to Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR) orders without families being told. Our Human Rights Lead Jacqui Graves provides the important clinical context behind the headlines.