News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

For journalist or media enquiries, please contact our press office.

Image of Sue Ryder directions signage outside Sue Ryder Manorlands Hospice

Coronavirus (Covid-19) guidance: visiting a Sue Ryder hospice or neurological centre

Visiting a Sue Ryder hospice or neurological centre remains significantly limited and continues to be carefully managed to ensure the safety of the people in our care, our staff and visitors.

Sue Ryder Nurse, Leonie Turner.

Sue Ryder Nurse encourages others to consider a rewarding career in palliative care

Leonie Turner, a palliative care nurse at Sue Ryder St John’s Hospice in Moggerhanger, is sharing her story this Hospice Care Week in the hope of inspiring others to follow a career in palliative care.

Paul Osborne, a client at Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre The Chantry

Man who learned to walk again takes on '26 miles in 26 days' challenge for Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre The Chantry

Paul Osborne, a client at Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre The Chantry is taking on a ‘26 miles in 26 days’ challenge to raise funds for the centre, where he received specialist care and physiotherapy, after surgery to remove a brain tumour left him unable to walk properly.

Russell and Rob in their cycling gear, on their 1,000 mile fundraising journey.

Cyclists take on 1,000 mile trip and raise thousands for Sue Ryder Duchess of Kent Hospice

Brothers-in-law Russell Champion and Rob Kingsford have raised over £33,000 for Sue Ryder Duchess of Kent Hospice in Reading by cycling from Lands’ End to John O’Groats, in memory of Russell’s aunt, Rachel Gormley, who was cared for at the hospice.

Alexander Winter sitting at his desk in the office.

Sue Ryder The Chantry apprentice wins inspirational national learning award

Alex Winter, Activities Supervisor at Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre The Chantry, has been awarded the Higher Apprentice of the Year Award at the Qube Awards 2020.

Fern, the IPU Manager at Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice

“There are so many elements of my job that I love.” Fern, Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice's Inpatient Unit Manager

After a variety of other nursing environments and more than a decade on from her first placement at Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice, Fern is now their IPU Manager. She describes her nursing and managerial responsibilities, as well as the challenges and joys of working in palliative care.

An online community user on a tablet in their home

Our Online Bereavement Support - a lifeline during lockdown

The effects of the Covid-19 pandemic have transformed daily life for everyone, with the impact on many bereaved people being even more severe due to their isolation in lockdown and a sudden loss of face-to-face support from family, friends or counsellors. In such a difficult time, Sue Ryder's Online Bereavement Support services have provided a vital lifeline.

Clare Cole, Therapies and Rehabilitation Service Lead at The Chantry

How Sue Ryder The Chantry's neuro-rehab unit adapted to Covid-19

Clare, the Therapies and Rehabilitation Service Lead at Sue Ryder Neurological Care Centre The Chantry's neuro-rehab unit, describes the effects of the coronavirus pandemic on their care services and how the team had to rapidly adapt to meet the needs of patients and their families.

Sue Ryder Nurse Caroline Salmon

“I started at Thorpe Hall in March and obviously things have been very different to how they would normally be.” Caroline, Sue Ryder Nurse

Arriving at Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice in March 2020, Caroline has had a long and varied career in nursing and brings a wealth of experience to Sue Ryder. But nothing could have prepared her for the impact Covid-19 would have on our healthcare system.

A Sue Ryder Nurse at Leckhampton Court Hospice

New report finds 200,000 people could die because of healthcare delays and economic effects of coronavirus lockdown

A new report from the Department of Health and Social Care, Office for National Statistics, Government Actuary's Department and the Home Office has found that 200,000 people could die because of delays in healthcare and the economic effects of the coronavirus lockdown.