News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

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Stuart Fisher - Volunteer at The Chantry

‘I do it because I absolutely love it.’ Chantry volunteer Stuart on the joys of helping others, getting back what you put in and the perils of Scrabble

Stuart Fisher, 69, has been a volunteer at Sue Ryder’s specialist neurological care centre, The Chantry, for more than five years. He drives residents to appointments, takes them on outings, to visit family and also visits a particular resident once a week for coffee, a chat and the occasional game of Scrabble.

Carers at St John's attending the Carers' Thursday support group

Inspiring Bedfordshire carers celebrate second anniversary

Carers’ Thursday, a support group for carers run by staff and volunteers from Sue Ryder St John’s Hospice and Carers in Bedfordshire, has just marked its second anniversary with a special celebration.

A Sue Ryder The Chantry Neurological Care Centre resident painting

It’s time to get it right for people with neurological conditions in England

People with neurological conditions in England are being let down by the very health and care systems that are supposed to be supporting them – that’s the finding of our new report Time to get it right, writes our Policy and Public Affairs Manager (England) Duncan Lugton.

Chantry resident Simon is helped into bed using a chair lift

Over 15,000 people with neurological conditions are being placed in nursing homes for the elderly, our shocking report reveals

Our new report, 'Time to get it right' published today, gives a comprehensive picture on how people with neurological conditions such as motor neurone disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease and acquired brain injury are being let down by health and social services in England.

Dee View Court neurological research team

Our research demonstrates economic value of proactive neurological care

Containing analysis carried out by independent experts, the report shows that proactive care early in someone’s life, such as self-management support and advice or respite care, can save in the region of 30–50% annually when compared to reactive care, i.e. when someone’s health requires urgent care.