News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

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The Lord Lieutenant of Rutland, Dr Sarah Furness, pictured at a small gathering of volunteers and staff to officially mark the opening

The Bereavement Help Point launches in Rutland

Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice is part of a pioneering new partnership supporting bereaved people in Rutland.

Two people holding hands during a counselling session.

“Being able to talk and to have somewhere to share how they are feeling without judgement or fear could really help someone to cope”

Clova McCallum, a counsellor for Sue Ryder’s Online Bereavement Counselling service, talks here of problems people who have been bereaved experience in their workplace and gives advice for employers, colleagues and those who have lost someone.

Two people talking during a counselling session

“The more we normalise death, the healthier, happier and more helpful we can be to ourselves and others who are grieving”

Felicity Ward, Counsellor for Sue Ryder’s Online Bereavement Counselling service, discusses the common issues she finds in the workplace for people who have been bereaved and gives advice for line managers, employees and colleagues on creating a supportive space for those going through grief.

Liz Maitland, Chaplain at Sue Ryder Manorlands Hospice

Hospice Care Week 2020: A day in the life - Liz Maitland, Chaplain at Sue Ryder Manorlands Hospice

Meet Liz Maitland, Chaplain at Sue Ryder Manorlands Hospice. Liz has worked at the hospice for 11 years and provides spiritual support to patients, families, carers and staff. Here, she talks us through a day in her life.

Jess Bacon as a child with her family

'Even if it's just to one person, or just one word, say something.' Jess Bacon's struggles with grief and the importance of opening up to others

At sixteen, Jess Bacon tragically lost her Dad. Here, she describes her struggles with depression and communicating about her loss, the silence of those around her who were scared to say the wrong thing and the liberating power of reaching out to people for support; 'Even if it's just to one person, or just one word, say something.'

Two people holding hands

Sue Ryder survey reveals almost half of people experience poor mental health following the death of a loved one

In response to the survey commissioned by Sue Ryder, we are launching our #JustSaySomething campaign in a bid to encourage everyone to open up about grief and bereavement, enabling a more honest, supportive grieving process for those affected and people supporting them.

National Grief Awareness Week Logo - A Heart with Two Hands

National Grief Awareness Week: Let's open up to grief

This week sees the UK’s first ever National Grief Awareness Week, encouraging us all to #OpenUpToGrief and break the taboo around death and bereavement, for a more open discussion of a subject which affects us all at some time in our lives.

Sue and Pete Woolfitt with Community Fundraiser Victoria Potter and Sue Ryder Nurses

Big-hearted bucket collectors raise £100,000 for Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall hospice - Hospice Care Week 2019 stories

Come rain or shine, Sue and Pete Woolfitt have loyally held bucket collections for Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice for nearly a decade – raising an incredible £100,000. This Hospice Care week we'd like to say thank you for their amazing support.

Cover of Postcards from the Land of Grief by Richard Littledale

Why I wrote 'Postcards from the Land of Grief': a book about bereavement

After Richard Littledale lost his beloved wife Fiona back in 2017, he decided to chronicle his experience of bereavement in the hope of comforting others. They have been turned into a book Postcards from the Land of Grief, published today, and 100% of the royalties will go directly towards Sue Ryder's expert and compassionate care.

Dee View Court Nurses discuss a patient

"No decision about me without me": why families must be involved in 'do not resuscitate' orders

Yesterday’s Daily Telegraph reported that, according to NHS nurses, too many patients are being subjected to Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR) orders without families being told. Our Human Rights Lead Jacqui Graves provides the important clinical context behind the headlines.