News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

For journalist or media enquiries, please contact our press office.

The Lord Lieutenant of Rutland, Dr Sarah Furness, pictured at a small gathering of volunteers and staff to officially mark the opening

The Bereavement Help Point launches in Rutland

Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice is part of a pioneering new partnership supporting bereaved people in Rutland.

A person sitting by a window in their living room

“Even the very best of times can have a tinge of sadness” Sue Ryder Counsellor Felicity offers advice on coping with grief over Christmas

Felicity Ward, Counsellor for Sue Ryder’s Online Bereavement Counselling service, gives her advice for people grieving at Christmas, the complex emotions which can arise during such a time of togetherness, and how their family and friends can provide support over the festive period.

A lady alone at home by a window, during Christmas

“It is OK to feel the way you do” Sue Ryder Counsellor Shane's advice for grieving at Christmas

Shane Smith, Counsellor for Sue Ryder’s Online Bereavement Counselling service, offers his advice for those grieving at Christmas who might be concerned about being with others or how they might feel at this time of year.

Two people holding hands during a counselling session.

“Being able to talk and to have somewhere to share how they are feeling without judgement or fear could really help someone to cope”

Clova McCallum, a counsellor for Sue Ryder’s Online Bereavement Counselling service, talks here of problems people who have been bereaved experience in their workplace and gives advice for employers, colleagues and those who have lost someone.

Two people talking during a counselling session

“The more we normalise death, the healthier, happier and more helpful we can be to ourselves and others who are grieving”

Felicity Ward, Counsellor for Sue Ryder’s Online Bereavement Counselling service, discusses the common issues she finds in the workplace for people who have been bereaved and gives advice for line managers, employees and colleagues on creating a supportive space for those going through grief.

Dale Anderson standing at the till in the Sue Ryder Goose Gate shop in Nottingham.

“I really think I’ve found my calling!” Volunteering in a Sue Ryder charity shop

When Dale Anderson joined the team at Sue Ryder’s Nottingham Goose Gate store he was looking for some work experience in the retail sector, but what he found was so much more.

Jackie and Mark Smith in their bright green December Daily Dash clothing.

“I really wanted to try and find something positive out of an incredibly sad situation.”

The December Daily Dash was started in 2015 by Jackie and Mark Smith after Jackie’s dad, Mike, was cared for by Sue Ryder in the last months of his life. Growing from just 13 participants in its first year to 550 last year, the event has raised an incredible £100,000 to date.

Jean Piper at the Incredible Colleagues Awards with Heidi Travis, in 2019.

Inspiring Wheatfields volunteer and fundraiser, Jean Piper, presented with special Sue Ryder award

Jean Piper’s husband Clive was cared for at Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice eleven years ago and Jean embarked on the ‘Dive for Clive’ skydive in his memory. Even when she herself was diagnosed with leukaemia she continued fundraising and volunteering in the Wheatfields shop, and it is that determination which saw her presented with the Sue Ryder Incredible Colleagues Award for Overcoming Obstacles last year.

Maggie the greyhound

A shout-out to the therapy dogs of Sue Ryder (and an alpaca, too)

In our latest blog, we want to celebrate the furry, four-legged Sue Ryder volunteers who work so hard to brighten the days of our patients, residents and families – not forgetting their humans!

Jess Bacon as a child with her family

'Even if it's just to one person, or just one word, say something.' Jess Bacon's struggles with grief and the importance of opening up to others

At sixteen, Jess Bacon tragically lost her Dad. Here, she describes her struggles with depression and communicating about her loss, the silence of those around her who were scared to say the wrong thing and the liberating power of reaching out to people for support; 'Even if it's just to one person, or just one word, say something.'