News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

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Bel Cornwell out on one of her walk routes

“The support has been above and beyond what I could have imagined.” Bel Cornwell's marathon challenge in aid of Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice

Bel Cornwell was diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease more than five years ago. Since then she has lost the ability to walk and talk and is confined to a wheelchair, but has completed her own ‘marathon’ challenge in aid of Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice, who have supported Bel and her family.

A patient receiving a head massage

“Patients tell me complementary therapy gives them a ‘holiday from pain’.”

Elaine Carpenter is Complementary Therapies Coordinator at Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice, leading a team of nine volunteers offering a wide range of complementary therapies to patients, carers and relatives. She explains what complementary therapies are and how they help.

Julie O'Connor volunteering at Leckhampton Court Ride for Ryder

"Sue Ryder enabled my husband Steve to have his last wish."

After Julie O’Connor’s husband was cared for by Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice, she started volunteering in any way she could to give something back. This is her story.

A Sue Ryder The Chantry Neurological Care Centre resident painting

It’s time to get it right for people with neurological conditions in England

People with neurological conditions in England are being let down by the very health and care systems that are supposed to be supporting them – that’s the finding of our new report Time to get it right, writes our Policy and Public Affairs Manager (England) Duncan Lugton.

Chantry resident Simon is helped into bed using a chair lift

Over 15,000 people with neurological conditions are being placed in nursing homes for the elderly, our shocking report reveals

Our new report, 'Time to get it right' published today, gives a comprehensive picture on how people with neurological conditions such as motor neurone disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease and acquired brain injury are being let down by health and social services in England.