News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

For journalist or media enquiries, please contact our press office.

James and Natalie who work on our maintenance team at Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice

“We help make sure the care given here continues” - Hospice Care Week 2019 stories

When thinking about the people who make our expert and compassionate palliative care possible, many think of our nurses, doctors and care staff. However, there are many working alongside our medical team who make sure our care can continue, like Natalie and James at Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice.

Sue and Pete Woolfitt with Community Fundraiser Victoria Potter and Sue Ryder Nurses

Big-hearted bucket collectors raise £100,000 for Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall hospice - Hospice Care Week 2019 stories

Come rain or shine, Sue and Pete Woolfitt have loyally held bucket collections for Sue Ryder Thorpe Hall Hospice for nearly a decade – raising an incredible £100,000. This Hospice Care week we'd like to say thank you for their amazing support.

Sonia Maisey is a Senior Staff Nurse at Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice

“One family told us we ‘bring the outside world in – love, laughter and life’”

Meet Sonia Maisey, a Senior Staff Nurse at our Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice. Sonia takes us through a day in her life as a member of the Hospice at Home team, which cares for people in their own homes.

Occupational Therapist Heather Bayliss outside Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Day Hospice

"My role is to empower people – and often it’s the smallest things that make the biggest difference."

Occupational Therapist Heather Bayliss shares how Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court’s multidisciplinary Day Hospice team supports people living with cancer, lung disease, heart failure or neurological conditions in Gloucestershire.

Jonathon, Richard and Simon Cox in their cycle helmets

Gloucestershire family take on 100-mile RideLondon-Surrey challenge for Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice

A family are challenging themselves to complete a 100-mile cycle to raise money for their local Sue Ryder Leckhampton Hospice, who supported their wife and mother when she died.

The Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice at Home team

"When I pull on my Sue Ryder Nurse uniform, I feel proud."

“The name Sue Ryder means a lot. When we wear our uniforms we feel part of something, and families feel in safe hands.” These are the words of Senior Nursing Assistant Julia Tyas who is part of our band of close-knit healthcare workers in Gloucestershire who help keep loved ones looked after at home at the end of their life.

Alan with his bike getting ready for Ride for Ryder in 1988

Why I'm taking on Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice's Ride for Ryder for the fourth time

Alan Sutor took part in Sue Ryder's first Ride for Ryder cycling event in 1988 aged just 14. Fast-forward 31 years to the present day and he is preparing to take on the 2019 Ride for Ryder. He tells us why.

Anne running past in her Sue Ryder vest at the Brighton Marathon

From snow to sea: nurse Anne's marathon journey

Anne, a Research Nurse at our Sue Ryder Leckhampton Court Hospice, battled sub-zero training runs to take part in the Brighton Marathon and raise over £1,500 to be there when it really matters. Here she talks about her #TeamIncredible experience.

A Sue Ryder The Chantry Neurological Care Centre resident painting

It’s time to get it right for people with neurological conditions in England

People with neurological conditions in England are being let down by the very health and care systems that are supposed to be supporting them – that’s the finding of our new report Time to get it right, writes our Policy and Public Affairs Manager (England) Duncan Lugton.

Chantry resident Simon is helped into bed using a chair lift

Over 15,000 people with neurological conditions are being placed in nursing homes for the elderly, our shocking report reveals

Our new report, 'Time to get it right' published today, gives a comprehensive picture on how people with neurological conditions such as motor neurone disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease and acquired brain injury are being let down by health and social services in England.