News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

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Nursing Assistant Penny Jarvis

“My husband’s wish was to die at home. He wanted to be surrounded by his own things with his family and friends around him.”

Penny Jarvis’s husband Colin died in 2009, five years after he was first diagnosed with a rare degenerative brain disease. Penny was Colin’s main carer and he was able to die in his own home according to his wishes. Ten years on and Penny, a Nursing Assistant, now works as part of the Hospice at Home team at Sue Ryder South Oxfordshire Palliative Care Hub.

Kirsty with her mum Kathleen making a toast

“Mum and I didn’t know what Dad would have wanted for his funeral. Because of that, we talked about what Mum’s final wishes would be.”

Kirsty Hodgson’s mum Kathleen spent the last two weeks of her life at Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice in Leeds in August 2016. Here, she recounts their story and explains why they made plans were put in place for the end of her mum's life.

Valerie with her daughter Harriet

“Not all of us will have the opportunity to plan our death and I feel that, if you can, you should.”

Valerie Bevan, 69, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis 26 years ago and now only has movement in her head and neck. She is a day patient at Sue Ryder Manorlands Hospice where her daughter Harriet works as a Community Fundraiser. This is her story in her own words.

Miki Mitchell whose husband was cared for by Manorlands and the Queensbury Queens of the Mountain cycling club

“Dust off your bike and join us so that Manorlands can be there for more people like Chris.”

When she lost her husband Chris to cancer last October, Miki Mitchell was devastated. However, through it all, our Sue Ryder Manorlands Hospice was there to provide support and now, one year on, Miki is supporting them – bringing with her 100 entrants to Manorlands’ annual Bronte Sportive cycling event.    

A Sue Ryder The Chantry Neurological Care Centre resident painting

It’s time to get it right for people with neurological conditions in England

People with neurological conditions in England are being let down by the very health and care systems that are supposed to be supporting them – that’s the finding of our new report Time to get it right, writes our Policy and Public Affairs Manager (England) Duncan Lugton.

Chantry resident Simon is helped into bed using a chair lift

Over 15,000 people with neurological conditions are being placed in nursing homes for the elderly, our shocking report reveals

Our new report, 'Time to get it right' published today, gives a comprehensive picture on how people with neurological conditions such as motor neurone disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease and acquired brain injury are being let down by health and social services in England.

Our useful guide can help you answer lots of tough questions

Why don't we talk about death?

It’s a tough question that Sue Ryder are trying to tackle. Our latest marketing campaign has been launched to encourage people to start the conversation about death, and to cement our position as experts in this area.