News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

For journalist or media enquiries, please contact our press office.

Jean Piper at the Incredible Colleagues Awards with Heidi Travis, in 2019.

Inspiring Wheatfields volunteer and fundraiser, Jean Piper, presented with special Sue Ryder award

Jean Piper’s husband Clive was cared for at Sue Ryder Wheatfields Hospice eleven years ago and Jean embarked on the ‘Dive for Clive’ skydive in his memory. Even when she herself was diagnosed with leukaemia she continued fundraising and volunteering in the Wheatfields shop, and it is that determination which saw her presented with the Sue Ryder Incredible Colleagues Award for Overcoming Obstacles last year.

A mum and a baby meet older homecare patients at an intergenerational afternoon tea

Sue Ryder Homecare Stirling brings generations together to encourage physical activity

Sue Ryder Homecare Stirling held an afternoon tea on Tuesday to bring together its service users, carers and their children to promote physical activity and intergenerational relationships.

A Sue Ryder The Chantry Neurological Care Centre resident painting

It’s time to get it right for people with neurological conditions in England

People with neurological conditions in England are being let down by the very health and care systems that are supposed to be supporting them – that’s the finding of our new report Time to get it right, writes our Policy and Public Affairs Manager (England) Duncan Lugton.

Joe FitzPatrick MSP exploring the virtual jungle pursued by gorillas

MSPs try our virtual reality therapy in the Scottish Parliament

Following a successful pilot with residents at Sue Ryder Dee View Court, we are now rolling out the use of virtual reality as a form of mood-boosting therapy across all of our neurological care centres.

Dee View Court neurological research team

Our research demonstrates economic value of proactive neurological care

Containing analysis carried out by independent experts, the report shows that proactive care early in someone’s life, such as self-management support and advice or respite care, can save in the region of 30–50% annually when compared to reactive care, i.e. when someone’s health requires urgent care.