News and blog

Latest news and blogs from Sue Ryder.

For journalist or media enquiries, please contact our press office.

Anthony Swan - A Registered Nurse at Wheatfields.

Year of the Nurse: Anthony Swan, from painting and decorating to leading change as a Sue Ryder Nurse

After eight years working in the painting and decorating industry Anthony Swan, 29, realised he had missed his true vocation and made the tough decision to retrain as a nurse. Now employed as a Registered Nurse at Sue Ryder’s Wheatfields Hospice in Leeds, he has teamed up with NHS England to help drive a new approach to person-centred care.

Dee View Nurses Ann Whyte and Louise Torrance

“There’s no doubt about it: the level of care here at Sue Ryder is higher than anywhere I’ve ever nursed."

Sue Ryder supported Ann Whyte though her Return to Nurse Practice qualification and she is now working as a Registered Nurse at our Sue Ryder Dee View Court Neurological Centre in Aberdeen. She looks back over her 30-year career and explains why Sue Ryder is such a special place to work.

Dee View staff laughing together

Why working at our neurological care centres is "not just another care job"

Tanya Robertson works at Sue Ryder Dee View Court Neurological Care Centre as a Care Assistant and is currently training to be a Nurse. Here, she describes why she loves working at Sue Ryder and is so excited for the future.

A Sue Ryder The Chantry Neurological Care Centre resident painting

It’s time to get it right for people with neurological conditions in England

People with neurological conditions in England are being let down by the very health and care systems that are supposed to be supporting them – that’s the finding of our new report Time to get it right, writes our Policy and Public Affairs Manager (England) Duncan Lugton.

Chantry resident Simon is helped into bed using a chair lift

Over 15,000 people with neurological conditions are being placed in nursing homes for the elderly, our shocking report reveals

Our new report, 'Time to get it right' published today, gives a comprehensive picture on how people with neurological conditions such as motor neurone disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease and acquired brain injury are being let down by health and social services in England.

Eileen, Pete and Julia Cook walking on the beach

“Loved ones depart but they leave behind precious memories.”

What happens when someone you love has died, leaving their belongings behind? How do you decide what to keep and – at what is such a painful time – work out which items ‘spark joy’? After watching the Tidying Up with Marie Kondo episode ‘Sparking Joy After A Loss’, Julia Cook reflects on losing her parents-in-law and how she navigated the difficult process of sorting through their effects.

Belinda and John on their wedding day at Manorlands Hospice

"I ran the Yorkshire Marathon because everyone should be more John”

Belinda took on the Yorkshire Marathon, alongside ten other Team Incredible runners, in support of our Manorlands Hospice in Oxenhope. In her own words, Belinda explains why running for Manorlands meant so much to her.

Bereavement support in Scotland - a report by Hospice UK and Sue Ryder

People struggling with bereavement unable to get support in Scotland

Bereaved people in Scotland are not receiving the support they need, according to new research commissioned by Sue Ryder and Hospice UK.

Dee View Court neurological research team

Our research demonstrates economic value of proactive neurological care

Containing analysis carried out by independent experts, the report shows that proactive care early in someone’s life, such as self-management support and advice or respite care, can save in the region of 30–50% annually when compared to reactive care, i.e. when someone’s health requires urgent care.