Advice and support

When you find out that someone you love is dying, it can be hard to know what to do next. This information will help you find your way.

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Supporting young people with grief

Young people are already coping with lots of stresses in their life, such as their changing hormones and important exams - so dealing with the death of someone they love can be particularly hard. It's important to make sure that they're getting the support they need.

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How do I support a bereaved child?

We all find it hard to cope when someone we love dies. Helping a child to cope with the loss of someone they love can be particularly difficult when you are dealing with your own grief. But there are things that you can do to support children through this difficult time.

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How long does grief last?

There is no timetable for how long grief lasts, or how you should feel after a particular time. After twelve months it may still feel as if everything happened yesterday, or it may feel like it all happened a lifetime ago. These are some of the feelings you might have when you are coping with grief longer-term.

Image of a thank you note from a young carer to a Sue Ryder hospice

Support for young carers

Are you under 18 years old? Do you help to look after someone who is dying – this might be your mum or dad, grandparents, brother or sister or maybe another relative, friend or neighbour? If this sounds like you – then you are a young carer.

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What is it like to be a carer?

You may not think about yourself as being a carer, you may simply see yourself as someone’s friend, partner, daughter or son. But if you’re looking after a person who can’t manage without your help, then you are a carer.

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Should children come to the funeral?

You know your child best and whether it feels right for them to go the funeral will depend on a range of factors - such as their age, their relationship to the person who has died, and whether they want to go. There is no right or wrong answer. But offering your child the option to go is one opportunity for them to say ‘goodbye’ to a special person.

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How do I organise a funeral?

Organising a funeral for someone you love can be stressful and overwhelming at a very emotional time. However, many people find funerals are a chance to gather with those who cared about the person who has died and celebrate their life.

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What needs to be done after a loved one dies?

Although this is likely to be a very emotional time, there are still some formal things that need to happen.

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How do I sort out money and belongings after a death?

Most people leave behind some possessions when they die, which might include money, property and their belongings, and together these things are called their ‘estate’. These are usually passed on to family, friends and people or organisations such as charities that your friend or relative has specified.

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Who do I need to tell about the death?

Sharing the news that your friend or relative has died is one of the most difficult and immediate responsibilities. If the person who has died has nominated you as executor, you will be responsible for sorting out their property, and carrying out the instructions in their will. This includes notifying friends and family, as well as formally notifying a number of people and organisations.