Advice and support

When you find out that someone you love is dying, it can be hard to know what to do next. This information will help you find your way.

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A hand signing a Last Will and Testament

What do I need to do to write a Will?

Making a Will is your opportunity to make sure that the people and charities you choose will benefit from your estate, so it is worth taking the time to think through what you want and to ensure that your Will is legal and valid.

A nurse helping an older gentleman around the garden

Do I need a Will?

Making a Will doesn’t need to be complicated and it can save your family unnecessary distress at an already difficult time to have your wishes clearly set out.

Image of two people talking

Coping as a carer

Sometimes caring can feel overwhelming, and people often tell us that they feel guilty making time for their own needs, but looking after yourself is the best way to ensure that you can be there to provide the care and support you want to for your friend or relative.

Image of a person with a rose stood next to a coffin

Planning ahead for your funeral

Thinking about and planning your funeral can feel very difficult, and some people prefer not to talk about it. Letting people know about any wishes can relieve your friends and family of some of the stress of organising your funeral, and can provide reassurance to those close to you that they are celebrating your life in the way you wanted.

Image of medical equipment

What is an Advance Care Plan?

An Advance Care Plan or advance statement is a written statement that sets out your wishes, beliefs, values and preferences about your future care. It provides a guide to help healthcare professionals and anyone else who might have to make decisions about your care if you become too unwell, to make decisions or to communicate them.

Image of a thank you note from a young carer to a Sue Ryder hospice

Support for young carers

Are you under 18 years old? Do you help to look after someone who is dying – this might be your mum or dad, grandparents, brother or sister or maybe another relative, friend or neighbour? If this sounds like you – then you are a young carer.

Image of a man and child playing with a toy house

Supporting a child when someone is dying

Even young children can pick up on how people around them are feeling and changes in routine, whether you have told them what is happening or not. These changes can feel very worrying and frightening, but there are ways that you can help them to cope.

Image of a child and adult walking into Thorpe Hall Hospice

Telling a child a loved one is dying

Only you know when the time is right and the best way to tell your child that someone they love is dying. This can be incredibly hard, but there are some approaches that can help.

Image of a child and a teddy

Should children come to the funeral?

You know your child best and whether it feels right for them to go the funeral will depend on a range of factors - such as their age, their relationship to the person who has died, and whether they want to go. There is no right or wrong answer. But offering your child the option to go is one opportunity for them to say ‘goodbye’ to a special person.

Image of a funeral flower arrangement

How do I organise a funeral?

Organising a funeral for someone you love can be stressful and overwhelming at a very emotional time. However, many people find funerals are a chance to gather with those who cared about the person who has died and celebrate their life.