Advice and support

When you find out that someone you love is dying, it can be hard to know what to do next. This information will help you find your way.

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Dee View Court Nurses discuss a patient

Can I get support as a carer?

You don’t have to do it all yourself, but it can be hard to know what support is available and how to get it. There are lots of different kinds of support and you may find some more useful than others.

A patient in a hospice and his family

What can I expect when death is near?

Although everyone is different, there are some common things that happen as part of the natural process of dying. At this stage, the person who is dying is often unaware of many of these things. But it can help those who care for them if they know what to expect.

Image of money

Can I get bereavement benefit?

If you have lost a spouse, partner or civil partner, you could be entitled to financial help, known as bereavement benefits, regardless of how much your income is.

Image of medical equipment

What is an Advance Care Plan?

An Advance Care Plan or advance statement is a written statement that sets out your wishes, beliefs, values and preferences about your future care. It provides a guide to help healthcare professionals and anyone else who might have to make decisions about your care if you become too unwell, to make decisions or to communicate them.

Image of a calculator

Getting financial support

When someone is dying, it can put a lot of financial pressure on them and those who care for them. In the last year of life, most people are eligible to receive at least some benefits. They may also be able to access charitable grants or other forms of support.

Image of an office desk with computer

Can I get bereavement leave from work?

If you are employed, you are entitled to some bereavement leave from work when a loved one dies. However, there is no set legal amount of leave. It can help to know your rights and how the system works.

Image of a young person and adult sat down

Supporting young people with grief

Young people are already coping with lots of stresses in their life, such as their changing hormones and important exams - so dealing with the death of someone they love can be particularly hard. It's important to make sure that they're getting the support they need.

Image of a thank you note from a young carer to a Sue Ryder hospice

Support for young carers

Are you under 18 years old? Do you help to look after someone who is dying – this might be your mum or dad, grandparents, brother or sister or maybe another relative, friend or neighbour? If this sounds like you – then you are a young carer.

Image of a man and child playing with a toy house

Supporting a child when someone is dying

Even young children can pick up on how people around them are feeling and changes in routine, whether you have told them what is happening or not. These changes can feel very worrying and frightening, but there are ways that you can help them to cope.

Image of a child and adult walking into Thorpe Hall Hospice

Telling a child a loved one is dying

Only you know when the time is right and the best way to tell your child that someone they love is dying. This can be incredibly hard, but there are some approaches that can help.