Our fundraising

Sue Ryder blog

This morning, an article was published in the Telegraph that inaccurately reports on how much money we spend on our charitable work. We want to correct that and provide you with the right information.

We need to raise £37.7m a year to keep our health care services running. Fundraising plays a crucial part in helping us to achieve this.

Our fundraised income comes from a variety of sources making it hard to make like for like comparisons across charities. Our income comes from legacies, events, regular and one off donations, support from corporate partners, donations from trusts and through community fundraising. And we also raise income through our 450 high street charity shops.

Our shops

Compared to other ways of raising money for charity, shops are a very different, based on business principles where a customer buys  something with a price attached to it, rather than making a cash donation.

Our 450 shops play an enormous part in raising money to help us provide more incredible care, generating £14m to support our work. But, as is the case with all charity shops, we have to spend a lot (£45.6m in 2014/15) to generate these funds.

And although we benefit from business rate reductions and the priceless contribution of our thousands of volunteers, we do have to pay full commercial rates for rent, utilities and services - as well as shop staff, stock collection and shop maintenance costs.

We’re now the 4th largest charity retailer in the UK and our shops play an invaluable part in helping us do what we do, but these costs can sometimes make us look like a ‘cost heavy’ organisation when compared with other charities without shops or with a smaller retail operation.

We know that charity shops also play a big part in the local community by providing volunteering opportunities, recycling clothes, toys, furniture and other household items as well as providing an alternative way for people to support a charitable cause. Not everyone wants to - or is able to - support charity through cash donations and many people like to help support our important work by giving in this way.

Our fundraising

We have a national fundraising team who manage legacies, corporate partnerships, individual giving and our lottery too. And we also have six hospice based fundraising teams working hard to raise funds and awareness in their communities.

We spend 72p of every pound we are given on providing incredible care. The figure is variable and it only takes one or two large donations in any year to push the ratio much higher.

2014/15 was an extraordinary year for us at Sue Ryder. Within the overall cost and income figures in our financial report, we have included two fundraising projects as well as our usual fundraising activity.

1. Our successful appeal to build a new hospice within the grounds of Thorpe Hall in Peterborough (£0.25m costs and £1.0m income) which finished in June 2015.

2. The first year of our three year charity partnership with Morrisons (£0.6m costs and £2.4m income). These costs include the first year costs of implementing new healthcare services and service expansion funded by our Morrisons partnership, including the new community health care services, family support teams and the development of our Online Community and Support.

These two projects show a ratio of 75p returned from each pound raised, however the nature of these areas makes the numbers very volatile from year to year, particularly for the Morrisons  project where these services are still in their infancy and we are committed to continue investing in them as they grow.

Excluding these two projects, our remaining fundraising income and costs are £12.3m and £3.5m respectively. This means that we are spending 72p of every pound we receive on our charitable aims of providing incredible hospice and neurological care.

You help us provide incredible care

Our fundraising and retail team are here to raise money to fund our work but we can’t do it without you. People support us in all kinds of ways – giving up time, clearing out their wardrobes, donating money, putting on community events, and spreading the word about what we do. Without this help we simply wouldn’t be able to carry on providing the services that so many depend on.

 

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Comments

  • on 04/01/2016 10:55 Mal Pleavin-Evans said:

    Just been reading up on the low charity as I am going to apply to become a volunteer at my local shop and am confused by your figures. Surely it is not cost effective to spend £45.6m to raise £14m or am I reading this wrong.

  • on 07/01/2016 18:23 jean love said:

    I have a three piece in good condition when your men came round they said we wouldnt take it because you can see where people have sat on it. I told them well I will order a new one and let you have that one he said we are an high end charity, surely an oxymoron with all the people out there going to food banks and living in poverty can you afford to take this stance. After also reading on your site about the desperate couple who stole a suite from your store, this surely gives you a clue of how desperate people are. Perhaps the echo would be interested in this story also.

  • on 07/01/2016 18:24 jean love said:

    I have a three piece in good condition when your men came round they said we wouldnt take it because you can see where people have sat on it. I told them well I will order a new one and let you have that one he said we are an high end charity, surely an oxymoron with all the people out there going to food banks and living in poverty can you afford to take this stance. After also reading on your site about the desperate couple who stole a suite from your store, this surely gives you a clue of how desperate people are. Perhaps the echo would be interested in this story also.

  • on 07/01/2016 18:25 jean love said:

    I have a three piece in good condition when your men came round they said we wouldnt take it because you can see where people have sat on it. I told them well I will order a new one and let you have that one he said we are an high end charity, surely an oxymoron with all the people out there going to food banks and living in poverty can you afford to take this stance. After also reading on your site about the desperate couple who stole a suite from your store, this surely gives you a clue of how desperate people are. Perhaps the echo would be interested in this story also.

  • on 10/01/2016 09:39 Pesh Framjee said:

    The so called True and Fair Foundation’s Report is hopelessly flawed. I have carried out a detailed critique of this report and none of the allegations stack up. See https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/so-true-fair-my-critique-flawed-report-why-cost-ratios-pesh-framjee They made rudimentary and basic errors in their analysis. (if the link does not work then Google ‘Neither True nor Fair’) In Sue Ryder's case they have not understood the impact of trading (See Section 5 of my critique). The charity could immediately achieve the T&F Report’s arbitrary target of charitable send of 65% simply by giving up their charity shops but this would mean that they have a lot less money for their charitable activities. In addition, this flawed report has failed to recognize that investing in a new hospice is as much charitable expenditure as providing services. (See Section 6 of my critique). More importantly we as donors and supporters of charities need to understand that it is not possible to measure the efficiency and effectiveness of a charity by comparing cost ratios and overhead rates. (See Section 8 of my critique). We should focus on what is being achieved in the important provision of care – this is shown in Sue Ryder's annual report and website. Do not be influenced by this report, it is superficial and has been proven to be hopelessly wrong. The Telegraph that headlined the report has provided a link to my critique as an update at the bottom of their article. Unfortunately, the misleading headline is what the readers see.

  • on 24/01/2016 11:40 Trevor said:

    Hi, I just want to say that its good that you use your time on behalf of those that need assistance. do you get financial support from the Government? having lost my dad 3 and a months ago and having to watch my dear Mum struggle to get through each day due to her age and many health problems it really upsets me to see how little help there is for her. and even though my mum is a proud woman and likes to soldier on without outside assistance, I nevertheless feel that outside assistance would be beneficial to her but as always there is the price tag. and when that increases the help tends to go down. and so I can't help visualizing a time when charities will probably shut shop cause the costs are too high. its a sad reality of life and unless the government finds a solution the situation will get worse. but until that day I hope sue Ryder will continue doing all it possibly can on behalf of a deserving cause. all best from Trevor

  • on 03/02/2016 14:34 True Light Communuty Development said:

    It is not good to give wrong information about such. this pains not only the sponsors of charity but even the charity organizations. it is very important for someone to get the right information before you put anything to the public. In case of such, a serous step should be taken against the concerned.

  • on 08/04/2017 20:27 Rose said:

    As I am an avid supporter of the Sue Ryder Foundation can you tell me what percentage of a donation given to your charity shop is actually donated to the foundation. Rose